Sunday, 18 October 2009

Sakura Of America


Our newest product is the Sakura of America range, SAkura make Solid Paint Markers and in their field ar the industry leaders, solid paint markers are £4 each and available here.
The tough marker for tough jobs, the Solid Marker is solidified paint in a marker stick. It marks through oil, grease, rust, mud, snow—inside or outside.
Dries within minutes, and is permanent once dry. Solid Markers won’t fade or wash off like chalk. The special “stay fresh” twist mechanism keeps paint fresh and ready to use.
Ideal for use on wood, cloth & canvas, plastic, steel & iron, rubber, cardboard, glass, fiberglass & concrete.
Solid marker features a tough, broad stroke, is quick-drying and virtually odorless.
This marker is widely used in commercial and industrial applications in construction, welding & fabrication, pipelines & drilling, assembly lines, automotive tires & windshields, HVAC, plumbing systems or with stencils.
Available in 11 colors: black, red, blue, green, purple, orange, yellow, white, fluorescent lemon, fluorescent orange and fluorescent pink.
Working temperature range: 14°F to 392°F (-10°C to 200°C) 13 mm wide mark can be trimmed with knife for smaller marks.
Alcohol based cleaners will remove ink from non-porous surfaces. Fluorescent colors are not lightfast.





Sakura initially started as a crayon company in 1921. Disappointed that traditional crayon colors didn’t mix or overlay well, the innovative founders of Sakura began to experiment with different formulations to create an ideal stick drawing material. By 1924, Sakura invented the first-ever oil pastel that combined oil and pigment and named it Cray-Pas, a combination of the two words crayon and pastel.
Our company heritage in art materials led to development of a specialized ink technology, Pigma ink, which is used in our Micron, Graphic and Brush pens. In the early 80’s, Sakura’s labs identified the need for an inexpensive drafting tool that used superior pigment instead of low-grade dye inks.
The breakthrough came with the discovery of how to reduce the pigment particles to submicron size so that the inks flow evenly through even the narrowest of pen nibs. Today, Pigma ink continues to be the most reliable archival quality ink on the market and is loyally used by architects, scientists, artists, cartoonists, and scrapbookers, to name a few.

In 1984, Sakura surprised the pen industry with its technological breakthrough invention of the first gel-based ink. The research team had spent many years trying different ingredients, developing and testing prototypes, but nothing would meet the Sakura quality and performance standards.
Despite many failures, the determined team finally hit a eureka moment, discovering a new ingredient in a chemical trade publication which was tested and turned out to be the answer to creating the perfect gel ink! In recognition of Sakura’s success in developing the world’s first gel ink pen, Japan’s patent office awarded Sakura the prestigious Inventors Award in 2000.

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